New Caledonia rejects independence from France for the second time

New Caledonia rejects independence from France for the second time

A majority of voters in the South Pacific archipelago of New Caledonia voted against independence from France for the second time.

The result will bring relief to President Emmanuel Macron’s government.

“Voters have had their say. They confirmed their wish to keep New Caledonia a part of France. As head of state, I salute this show of confidence in the Republic with a profound feeling of gratitude,” President Macron said in a statement.

“We have two years to look to the future,” he added.

New Caledonia became a French colony in 1853. It lies some 750 miles east of Australia and 12,500 miles from Paris.

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